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Click a number along the wagon trail




Take photos of medicines and relatives as we pick along the trail, draw them into pictures with pencil crayons on old yellow paper that belonged to your mom when she was a kid.

Write what you harvested and what you learned, like moshom does in his pocketbook each day.

Give them this map and hope it makes them laugh.

Pass by the North West field, chew the grain like gum.

Cool shaded watering hole tucked behind a crop, rub your fingers together to smell like mint.

High bush cranberries hang overhead, pull the branches down like a slingshot. Hazelnuts along the bush line.

Brambles of saskatoons that cousins come to pick in margarine containers.

Look up and curse at the plane flying too low.

Eyes sharp for rosehip- pick them in the Fall for mom.





For colder days
is a collection of memories from warmer seasons, reminding us of the fondness felt digging in soil, crouching low along the bush line to spot the perfect berry, and reaching upward through high brambles during harvest. Audio recordings, photographs, and both finished and unfinished drawings, follow an old wagon trail in late Summer and early Fall, sharing the warmer memories that tuck us in for the Winter. Once used by relatives for travel, connecting between homes and hunting spots, the trail is now used for buggy rides and play. But across generations, it has always been a place of harvest, in laughter or quiet. It starts from North West fields and continues further West, then South and East, before returning North again; we follow desire paths in long grasses and between bush lines, little dirt trails alongside crops that take us up the hill from the lowest spot on the land to the highest.
Part fiction and part archive to uphold personal privacies, For colder days reassures us in a point and click style that in Winter while we try and rest, we’ll remember last season's harvest and the days will slowly become longer again.



Kiona Callihoo Ligtvoet (she/her) is a multidisciplinary artist practicing in amiskwaciwâskahikan on Treaty 6 Territory. She grew up West of the city near the hamlet of Calahoo where she lived with her relatives on scrip land. Her family lines are Cree and Métis descending from Michel First Nation, as well as Dutch and mixed European. Kiona works in painting, printmaking, and drawing, recollecting personal stories of grief and tenderness. Her practice uses a non-linear telling of her memories through narrative work as a form of diaristic archiving. It draws from feelings of loss and enfranchisement, but also from deep belly laughter, and a gentle fondness for where the histories between herself and her family overlap and disperse.
Working alongside other artists in initiatives of community care, Kiona co-organizes Making Space in partnership with Sanaa Humayun. Kiona likes visiting her moshom on the farm, and gossiping with her mom, relatives, and friends on the prairies :)